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I bought my new road bike yesterday: details and photos!

Thursday, October 11, 2012 by  
Filed under Daily Blog

October
11
2012

My hunt for a road bike is finally over!

As a mountain biker who has not been on a road bike in more than 20 years, I had a lot of ground to cover before deciding on my bike of choice. This project has been enjoyable, but also sometimes difficult and confusing. The advice I received from people whose opinions I respect a great deal was, quite often, completely at odds! At first I found the contradictory advice confusing, but ultimately those varied opinions drove me to deeper amounts of research and benefited the outcome. To everyone who has taken the time to post or email me your advice and thoughts, my most sincere thanks. I feel I made a great choice, and you folks made me think long and hard about that choice.

I was very close to purchasing a bike from Bikes Direct, but near the end of the research process I had a change of heart. I detailed some of the reasons for that change in yesterday’s blog.

Lately I’ve been doing some urban assaults (road riding) on my mountain bike, and I’ve really enjoyed them. As most of you know, once I take in an interest in something I always go full-bore. I would have been foolish to not take that into consideration.

Originally my idea was to get a decent road bike simply for training, but in the back of my mind I sort of knew that the road bug would probably bite pretty hard. It took a few urban rides on my mountain bike to get me to admit that to myself, however!

I decided that if I purchased a low-end road bike I would probably be upgrading withing six months–ultimately costing me more money.

Pretty much about the time I made the choice to go with a higher end road bike, David’s World Cycle (which is where I bought my Fuel mountain bike) began an incredible blow-out on their brand new 2011 and 2012 bikes still in inventory. A big thanks to Paul Lewis for bring this sale to my attention.

The Trek Madone 5.9

The Trek Madone 5.9

The sale discounts were all very heavy, but one in particular was almost too good to be true: the 2011 Trek Madone 5.9. The 2011 model originally sold for $4,200 (the 2013 model sells for more than $5,000), and David’s World had discounted the bike down to an amazing $2,597.40–brand new, full factory warranty.

There were only four of these bikes available, and by the end of the first day there was just one left. The deal was just too good to pass up and, unless I acted quickly it would be gone forever. The Lake Mary location had the only remaining bike, and it was in my size. I called yesterday morning just before the shop opened to make sure the last bike was still there. It was. I purchased the bike online with the understanding that if it didn’t fit or I didn’t like it I would receive a full refund.

I drove down to the shop, which is conveniently located right on the Seminole-Wekiva bike trail. I took the bike for a nice long ride on the trail, and fell in love with it. I could not believe how light, stiff and agile the bike felt. No matter how hard I mashed the bike didn’t flex, and I felt like all the power I was generating translated to pure, unadulterated, glorious speed. 🙂

I’ve been told that riding a fine road bike is like driving a Ferrari. I’d have to agree.

The bike weighs (sans-pedals) just 16.4 pounds. It’s full carbon, and the groupset is a mix of top-of-the line Dura-Ace and Ultegra. The pedals I’ll be using (they are on the way) are Shimano Ultegra, which weigh just 314 grams.

The color of the bike would not have been my first choice, but it’s growing on me. The blue looks absolutely amazing in the sun. I’ll be replacing the saddle with a black one (still deciding on which), and will probably replace the white grip tape with black.

Here are a whole bunch of pictures I took yesterday (click to zoom), followed by complete specs on the bike.

New 2011 Trek Madone 5.9 H2: 58mm 5 Series TCT Carbon frame in Gloss White/Placid Blue/Black.

New 2011 Trek Madone 5.9 H2: 58mm 5 Series TCT Carbon frame in Gloss White/Placid Blue/Black.

Shimano Dura-Ace crankset (50/34), 90mm Bottom Bracket and Shimano Ultegra front Derailleur.

Shimano Dura-Ace crankset (50/34), 90mm Bottom Bracket and Shimano Ultegra front Derailleur.

Shimano Dura-Ace Rear Derailleur, Shimano Ultegra Cassette (11-28).

Shimano Dura-Ace Rear Derailleur, Shimano Ultegra Cassette (11-28).

Shimano Ultegra STI shifters, Shimano Ultegra STI brake levers, Bontrager gel tape grips, Bontrager Race Blade VR Handlebars, Bontrager Race X Lite Stem, Garmin Edge 500 Premium Red Edition.

Shimano Ultegra STI shifters, Shimano Ultegra STI brake levers, Bontrager gel tape grips, Bontrager Race Blade VR Handlebars, Bontrager Race X Lite Stem, Garmin Edge 500 Premium Red Edition.

Shimano Ultegra brakes and Bontrager Race X Lite w/E2 aluminum steerer, carbon crown and legs.

Shimano Ultegra brakes and Bontrager Race X Lite w/E2 aluminum steerer, carbon crown and legs.

Integrated Bontrager DuoTrap ANT+ digital speed/Cadence sensor.

Integrated Bontrager DuoTrap ANT+ digital speed/Cadence sensor.

Internal cable routing.

Internal cable routing.

Bontrager Affinity 2 saddle with hollow chromoly rails and Bontrager Ride Tuned Carbon seatpost (20mm offset).

Bontrager Affinity 2 saddle with hollow chromoly rails and Bontrager Ride Tuned Carbon seatpost (20mm offset).

Bontrager Race Lite wheels and Bontrager R3 tires (700x23c).

Bontrager Race Lite wheels and Bontrager R3 tires (700x23c).

Paint detail.

Paint detail.

 

Detailed specifications:

FRAMESET
Size: 58cm
Frame: Series TCT Carbon, E2, BB90, internal cable routing, DuoTrap compatible
Fork: Bontrager Race X Lite w/E2 aluminum steerer, carbon crown and legs

WHEELS
Wheels: Bontrager Race Lite
Tires: Bontrager R3, 700x23c

DRIVETRAIN
Shifters: Shimano Ultegra STI, 10 speed
Front Derailleur: Shimano Ultegra
Rear Derailleur: Shimano Dura-Ace
Crank: Shimano Dura-Ace, 50/34
Cassette: Shimano Ultegra 11-28, 10 speed

COMPONENTS
Saddle: Bontrager Affinity 2, hollow chromoly rails
Seat Post: Bontrager Ride Tuned Carbon seatmast cap, 20mm offset
Handlebars: Bontrager Race Blade VR, 31.8mm
Stem: Bontrager Race X Lite, 7 degree, 31.8mm
Headset: Integrated, cartridge bearings, sealed, alloy, 1-1/8″ top, 1.5″ bottom
Brakeset: Shimano Ultegra brakes w/Shimano Ultegra STI levers
Components: Shimano Dura-Ace Lite

John Stone Fitness Comments

20 Responses to “I bought my new road bike yesterday: details and photos!”
  1. Congratulations, John!! Wow, what a shocker. I was betting you’d go for the Fuji. The bike you came home with looks very much like my 2011 Madone P1. I’m curious to hear how you get along with that Bontrager seat after you’ve ridden it a while. I swapped mine for an Adamo Road Saddle, which I found to be far more comfortable. One word of warning: be very careful how you strap the bike down when transporting it in your vehicle. Those decals on the frame are very fragile and will rub right through. Consider wrapping soft cloth around the parts of the frame that come in contact with the clamps on your bike rack – something I wish I’d done. 🙁

    Now get out there and claim all those KOM’s that have been waiting patiently for you! I can already hear Sugar Loaf calling your name. 🙂

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    • I agree with Andrew on taking care when transporting your bike. Another word of advice for carbon frames and protecting them, buy some clear bra and cover your frame (or at least the parts most likely to get scraped). This will keep it looking like new for a long time.

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    • I’m pretty sure I’m going to wind up swapping the saddle out, the stock Trek saddles always blow. I did 30 miles on it this morning, but it’s too early to tell. Any new saddle will, of course, require some time to get used to. I’ll keep ya posted.

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      • If you managed 30 miles on the stocker without great discomfort, you’re already doing much better than I did. After logging 200 miles it felt just as bad as it did on the first ride. If they haven’t told you already, David’s has several other saddles they’ll loan you for a week or two to decide if you want to buy it. That’s how I ended up with the Adamo.

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        • I’ll second Andrew on the Adamo Road saddle. I’ve been cycling for 6 years and got an Adamo Racing 2 saddle about a month ago after trying 2 others from my LBS. Big improvement over the Terry I was using before.

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  2. Hey,
    You listened to me and came to your senses I see. Thank goodness you didn’t buy the polished turd of a Motobecane. Now you have a proper road bike that you won’t need to to upgrade other than maybe the wheelset down the road.

    Plus at that price, you got a good deal on Trek’s TCT level carbon. FYI, that is not their OCLV high end carbon made in USA, but you would never really feel the difference on the road. I used to have a Trek OCLV but even these Madone’s are light years ahead as far as road feel. My buddy has your same frame. Nice and stiff in the bottom bracket for snappy acceleration.

    Once again, I have been riding for 25 years so I have a lot of knowledge on these issues. You are the same height as me but why did you go with a 58cm? Seems a bit on big side. I ride a 56cm or even 55cm depending upon geometry. If you find that you need to ride with stem flipped up as it is or need to get a shorter stem to reduce you reach to handlebars, you may need one size smaller.

    Like I said before, it is VERY HARD to get a bike under 16lbs in that size with pedals, cages and computer for under $3500-4K.

    You may not like how I say things, but Congrats nonetheless.

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    • See, and you thought I was just being suborn.

      I definitely appreciated the advice, I was just trying to get past the hyperbole and to the meat of your opinions. You came through in your second post, and I definitely took that advice–and your experience–to heart.

      The way I’m built I tend towards larger sizes. The 18.5″ Fuel I ride is a little on the small size for me. The 56cm frame also made me feel cramped. The 58cm frame felt great on my test ride, and this morning I did another 30 miles. I definitely got the right size frame.

      Real, REAL happy with the bike. Thanks again.

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      • I’m so glad you spent the extra on the Trek. No compormise, no excuse bike and groupset.

        As far as size, I did say is “seems” on big side and you “may” need one size smaller because it really does vary from one bike to another and based on the person’s inseam and torso, arm length, flexibility etc etc. As long as it is comfortable you’re set.

        You have a good amount of spacers under the stem. As you get more used to bike and flexible, you can lower stem and bars to get more aero. Usually, the shop will cut down steerer once you know where you want to be but there is not going back after that.

        Once I am dialed in, I usually have them cut it down and leave a 5mm spacer on top of stem as well as whatever amount under to get my ideal set up. It really becomes like a pair of old shoes, you’ll know if a hair measurement is off.

        FYI, if you find that you have any front knee pain, you’re saddle may be to low. Pain behind knee, you saddle may be too high. General rule, but it is usually the case.

        Be safe, and not a bad time on your maiden voyage. Us old roadies call that “New Bike Syndrome”.
        Jeff

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  3. Congratulations on your new bike! Looks very nice, I like the blue color!

    I hope you find some good friends to ride with, when riding in a tight group where you can slipstream you will easily get up to speeds like 25-30mph, you will love it!

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    • Oh yeah, almost all of my mountain bike buddies are roadies, too. A big part of the reason I decided to get into road riding is because my friends have regular group rides, and they tell me that they are not easy rides. That sounds like my kind of riding. 🙂

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  4. Quick thing about saddle. You have a stock saddle but just don’t accept it as the best for you. Saddles are VERY PERSONAL and everyone’s anatomy is different. However, the Fizik Arione is probably one of the best overall ever made. This is not hype.
    If you find stock saddle isn’t comfortable which it may be for you, consider the Arione. I have them on 4 of my 5 road bikes. I have a light weight nut buster on one but weight savings isn’t worth it.

    http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/components/saddles/product/review-fizik-arione-kit-with-red-bar-tape-10-37547

    http://reviews.wiggle.co.uk/7867-en_gb/5360043703/arione-cx-saddle-with-k-ium-rails-reviews/reviews.htm

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    • Fizik saddles are well-known to me, but I’ve never tried one. As posted in another comment, I’ve been using the WTB Devo on my MTB since March and I love it. It’s a great XC MTB saddle, but is also a fantastic road bike saddle. Plus, I’m used to it. 190g. That’s probably what I’ll get if I swap.

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    • Hey Dev, I am 100% lycra now, where have you been? 😉 I also love DZNuts, great stuff.

      I have currently have 4 excellent bib shorts and 6 jerseys. I can’t go back to anything else, lycra is just too cool and comfortable. More to come. 🙂

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